Ice skates on ice with one toe pointed

How sport helped this Team UOP member through an eating disorder

  • 25 February 2021
  • 3 min read

Our Sporting Minds mental health awareness month continues with stories from Team UOP member's. These honest and frank stories are an example of how sport and physical activity can play a part in improving mental health. We want to raise awareness for these stories and of the issues they look to challenge. These personal stories are powerful and should start up conversations between you and your friends, family and team-mates. We have also supplied a number of resources below if you are affected by this story.

This story is anonymous and is a powerful reminder that you may not be aware of the difficult time friends and family may be going through, this is their story.

 

I have always loved being active, but there became a point for me when exercise became obsessive and unhealthy because I was suffering from an eating disorder. This type of mental health condition often can cause lots of unhelpful and irrational thoughts that it is important to challenge in order to recover. I think the advice I would give to anyone suffering with an eating disorder is that even in the worst days of recovery, it will always be better than one of your best days living with an eating disorder. But also, that what you’re going through is valid and finding a support network of people who are there for you is so important.

Since being at university joining societies such as cheerleading, but also participating in ice skating lessons outside of university, I have learned to love being active again because these sports are fun, challenging and rewarding. I think having a healthy relationship with sport again has really helped with my recovery, and I am so proud of how far I’ve come even if some days it was really tough. Cheer and ice skating have also helped me gain confidence in myself and meet loads of new people. I would encourage anyone no matter how old they are to try a new sport and find something you enjoy doing so much you don’t even remember you are working out.

I think the advice I would give to anyone suffering with an eating disorder is that even in the worst days of recovery, it will always be better than one of your best days living with an eating disorder.

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If you need some support with your own mental health at this time, the student wellbeing service have a number of resources to help.

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